SVG 2.0 gets more features for artistic application

SVG 2.0 gets more features for artistic application

W3C published a new working draft of SVG 2.0 that features substantial changes among fixes and smaller improvements. Some of these changes indicate a further drive towards artistic use of SVG.

First and foremost, the spec now references to “Compositing and Blending 1.0” specification that introduces all sort of improvements to how objects are composited, and adds blending modes like overlay, color dodge, color burn, hard light and soft light.

The spec now also references to “CSS Masking Level 1” specification which is currently at editor's draft stage (last updated on April 5, 2013).

Another addition to the specification is a new type of joins for strokes, called 'arcs' (on the illustration above). This new join type was prototyped by Johan Engelen as part of his work on the PowerStroke live path effect for Inkscape, and further developed by Tavmjong Bah who is Inkscape's representative in the SVG Working Group.

If you are curious about the math, last year Tavmjong posted a detailed explanation on his website. Here are all four types of stroke joins, as per SVG 2.0 working draft:

As you can see, the arcs join clearly has more appealing, artistic look. Tavmjong says that Inkscape 0.49 is unlikely to get the new features, although the version after that could use them. Inkscape also needs a slight modification in the Cairo library to support the arcs join, and Tavmjong already patched it.

The complete working draft of the SVG 2.0 specification is available online for everyone to study.

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9 Responses. Comments closed for this entry.

  1. Personally, the only thing I’m really hanging out for, is the ability for a path to have variable width without messing about with complicated live path effects.

    I have no idea, but I’m hoping this is in the 2.0 spec…

  2. Unfortunatly, I recall that the variable path width was in the initial propositions, but the group didn’t think it was of any use…

    Between this and the missing of toner-filter the only reason to look forward to svg 2.0 are the gradient mesh and the colour profile support.

  3. No CMYK in sight?

  4. Alexandre Prokoudine 11 April 2013 at 9:40 pm

    @Inti, of course there is CMYK in sight :)

    https://svgwg.org/svg2-draft/color.html#Unmanaged

  5. Not any use?!!!?! How can they not notice that almost every drawing (digital or analogue) throughout history uses line width extensively to convey form, shape and expression. The only ones that don’t are the ones that avoid it specifically for stylistic reasons. No illustrator would *ever* consider that varying line width didn’t have any use. Argh. They only need to look at almost any illustration ever done to see this!

    Please. Just shoot me now.

    *facepalm*

  6. Alexandre Prokoudine 14 April 2013 at 2:14 pm

    @Bugsbane, please read http://bit.ly/Z0gXYF before overreacting ;-)

  7. The proposed changes are hugely exciting ones that I, for one, can’t wait to see available within Inkscape. The addition of sophisticated blend modes to layers would definitely open up lots of possibilities when it comes to creating more dynamic designs and artwork. Thanks for keeping us all updated with progress.

  8. Personally, the only thing I’m really hanging out for, is the ability for a path to have variable width without messing about with complicated live path effects.

  9. @Free Blogger Templates - Couldn’t agree more, although I’m thrilled that at least with live path effects in Inkscape, it’s at least possible, even if it isn’t in the SVG spec yet.

    I would be nice to be more universal and accessible though.