Pianoteq 5 released, features more vibrant emulated piano sound

Pianoteq 5 released, features more vibrant emulated piano sound

Modartt finally released a major update to Pianoteq — arguably world's best proprietary virtual piano.

The new version, available for Linux, Mac, and Windows, features two essential changes:

  1. New soundboard model and attack calculation to ensure more clear and vibrant sound. The new model is already used in D4, Blüthner Model 1, YC5 Rock Piano and upright U4 piano (D4 and YC5 were actually redone from scratch).
  2. You can now choose from 15 cardioid mics instead of using a single generic virtual one (right-click on a mic's icon on the matrix) and change their polarity. Even more interesting: you can now link mics for moving and freely rotate them in 3D.

As usual, mics setup is only available in Standard and Pro bundles.

НSetting up mics in Pianoteq 5

With the updated physical model at hand the team created K2, a new grand piano that comes to replace K1. You can listen to demos at the model's own page.

Modartt also teamed up with Austrian Kremsegg Schloss Museum to create two more sets of virtually restored old grand pianos, including Streicher (1852), Erard (1849), Besendorfer (1829), Dohnal (1795), Bechstein (1899), Pleyel (1835), Frenzel (1841), Broadwood (1796). You can listen to samples and buy them here and here. Pre-existing models from the KIVIR project will be updated to benefit from the recent changes in upcoming releases.

There's already a very inspiring video review of Pianoteq 5 at YouTube made by Phil Best where he plays new and updated instruments (scroll to 2:40 to skip the talking).

As usual, Linux users get Pianoteq as a standalone application with JACK support, as well as LV2 and native Linux VST plugins. Trial version works for 20 minutes and mutes several keys.

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16 Responses. Comments closed for this entry.

  1. I totally like Pianoteq, and this release is excellent. It’s wonderful that they support GNU/Linux. Also, it fully works with multi-channel output which makes it work with various microtonal / alternate-tuning implementations.

    All that said, it should have been emphasized for a Libre-focused blog that Pianoteq is proprietary, not Free/Libre in any way.

  2. Alexandre Prokoudine 24 May 2014 at 5:28 am

    All that said, it should have been emphasized for a Libre-focused blog that Pianoteq is proprietary, not Free/Libre in any way.

    Because libre software can have trial versions with disabled features?

  3. “Because libre software can have trial versions with disabled features?”

    What are you saying? Freeware can have pro version, Free/Libre Software not. In fact Pianoteq has a proprietary license.

  4. Alexandre Prokoudine 25 May 2014 at 11:46 pm

    @Alex L. And your point is…?

  5. Aleve Sicofante 26 May 2014 at 3:09 am

    Nor libre neither graphics. WTF?

  6. Aleve Sicofante 26 May 2014 at 3:11 am

    I meant “Neither libre nor graphics. WTF?” :-)

  7. Alexandre Prokoudine 26 May 2014 at 11:30 am

    The About page has a disclaimer about libre/non-libre. It’s been that way since the launch of the website 5 years ago. Hardly any news for a dedicated reader such as yourself :)

    As for graphics/non-graphics, in the fullness of time LGW will die to make way for a new project that won’t be glued to a particular line of creative work. Until then, if you feel like visiting again, you will have to continue dealing with occasional sound/video related material, because, quite frankly, coverage on non-graphics stuff is no news either.

  8. @Alexandre You said bullshit on libre software, you probably confuse it with open source software.

    You can post articles on what you want but you can’t write bullshit like “Because libre software can have trial versions with disabled features?”

  9. Alexandre Prokoudine 27 May 2014 at 12:25 am

    @Alex L.

    “Because libre software can have trial versions with disabled features?” simply means “You don’t seriously expect software to have trial versions with disabled features and still be libre software, do you?”, that’s all.

    I don’t expect you to apologize for your quite arrogant behavior, but please consider not commenting here again until you absolutely understand the words you read.

    And no — I can and I may write whatever I like. Freedom of speech is a wonderful thing.

  10. “The About page has a disclaimer about libre/non-libre. It’s been that way since the launch of the website 5 years ago. Hardly any news for a dedicated reader such as yourself :)”

    Read it for the first time today. Agreed to a point, though. How friendly are Pianoteq developers to the libre community? :)

    “As for graphics/non-graphics, in the fullness of time LGW will die to make way for a new project that won’t be glued to a particular line of creative work. Until then, if you feel like visiting again, you will have to continue dealing with occasional sound/video related material, because, quite frankly, coverage on non-graphics stuff is no news either.”

    LibreCreativeWorld :)

  11. @Aleve, e.g. Pianoteq guys contributed a very impressive amount of patches to the Linux port of JUCE, a free/libre GUI toolkit used by both libre and proprietary audio/MIDI software.

  12. i wish pianoteq’s sound would not break down so much in headphones & speakers. Phillipe says get good headphones? Okay. But when you make a sound recording and people tell you they don’t like the sound of the piano, and then they tell you they have good headphones or speakers there goes your artistic career. Notice that there are no albums of any solo sampled pianos or pianoteq for that matter that are played and raved about regularly on the radio or TV. Just elitist artists like pollini with zillion dollar mixing studios and very expensive modified real pianos. But they get played. I know someone will argue this point, but I would ask them nicely to please show me the great sampled or modeled solo piano classical recordings that are regularly played and raved on the radio tv etc., Reality 101

  13. tried trial version. Not bad. Maybe I will buy a full version.

  14. Okay; Where are the great presets in pianoteq 5, It took me over 200 hours to find them in pianoteq 4. Whenever I bought a piano module over the last 40 years there were always sounds that they said sounded best. I am not going to argue with anyone about this. Suffice it to say even when i have to mix pianoteq with its reverbs and such, it always breaks down and does not sound real, and when previewing those pieces in different headphones and speakers it can turn into even more of a disaster or a nightmare. The slight higher sounds of the tones in pianoteq are like razor blades to my ears, not at all like a real piano is with rounded pleasant sounds. Go to pianoteq demo page, see for yourself, if you think thesse pieces sound anything like a real piano you should listen to a real piano more often!

  15. Remember This My Dear Reader, Us Consumers Are Right In The Middle Of These Piano Sample, Model, Module, Marketing Hype Wars. And This Is What Is Happening In Every Other Area Of The Economy Too. (P.S. the U.S. debt just hit 18 trillion!)

  16. I think Pianoteq 5 is a tour de force. The Bluthner, when played through nice headphones, really sounds like a grand piano. I can’t believe my ears. I had Pianoteq 4.5, and I would sometimes hear phase shifting and wooshing sounds that immediately betrayed artificiality. Not so with Pianoteq 5.
    It’s not perfect, but closer than anyone else has gotten. I’m going back to my Pianoteq now, bye bye!